Criminal Genes

 

Most people often wondering and asking, “Where do criminals inclination come from?”image

We have so many theories about that, like: Nature which means by prenatal influences, temperature and responsiveness at birth’ while “Nurture” are treatment by others, learning by example, traumatic experiences and peer pressure.

As my background studies of Genes and the Human Condition to Biotechnology, I have found out and learned that genes may contribute a major role in criminal behavior in all aspect. In other words, being bad could be inherited genetics. So it means that even if a person is derived from a proper upbringing and well family, though, but if his ancestor is a criminal there’s a big possibility that he might be the same, too. On condition that he inherited the criminal or warrior genes which becomes dominant while growing up.

However, researchers say genetic profiling should not yet be used in criminal courts. But despite of this view, echoed by many other scientists, there has been several instances of defense lawyers using genetic information to reduce sentences.

According to BBC News:

In 2009, a court in Italy reduced the sentence of a criminal with genes linked to bad behavior. In a similar case in the US a murderer’s genetic profile was highlighted as a contributing factor for his crime.

Commenting on the latest study, Dr Ferguson said it added to our understanding of the factors involved in violent crime.

“Studies like this really document that a large percentage of our behavior in terms of violence or aggression is influenced by our biology – our genes – and our brain anatomy.

“It’s important to conceptualize crime and violence, where it comes from, even if we would not want to radically change the criminal justice system.”

Brett Haberstick from the University of Colorado, Boulder in the US, said the work illustrates that “finding genes for criminal behavior is going to be difficult”, despite a long tradition of biological work in the area of criminology.

He said it would be important for others with similar data to replicate the study.

“It is worthwhile to look for biological contributions to criminal or antisocial behavior as their impact on individuals, communities and society in general is sizeable. What I think, however, is that it is vital that environmental influences are considered as well,” he told BBC News.

Jan Schnupp at the University of Oxford was critical of the work. He commented that up to half the population could have one of the genes involved.

“To call these alleles ‘genes for violence’ would therefore be a massive exaggeration. In combination with many other factors these genes may make it a little harder for you to control violent urges, but they most emphatically do not predetermine you for a life of crime.”

 

About Butterfly Kisses

Just simply love to write on my spare time and I love web designing too.I started writing from a young age and most of my writing skills are self taught.My goal in any of my writing is to uplift and encourage people,sharing my thoughts to express myself and convey message to others.