The Hard Reality of Being Employed (23.5)

employedThere are usually two sources in which a Filipino earns a living in the Philippines.

One is employment and the other one is putting up a business.

Traditions and our predecessors have shaped the the usual mindset of a typical Filipino to; “concentrate on our studies so that when the time comes we will be able to latch on a job that would give us all our dreams. Everyday you give your best, every request of your boss you oblige. You rant the days when you work, you rant at your boss. You rant and rant and rant. Still you go to work, every 15 and 30 you receive the same salary, regardless of how you put your energy, your time and your concentration on what you do.

After 30 years did you reach your dreams?

Most employed people will tell you that they have neither a fat savings account nor a wheel of a car, after the years they toiled and work their way to employment. They wasted their time on being in a rat race, that neither their will or their options prevented them to do so. Why? Because it is what our fore-fathers have left for us to ponder and inject in our beliefs. That education will cushion our difficult lives and steer our ship to calm waters. So another question would pop up. If putting up a business will be tha answer to time and financial freedom (i’m not saying it would always be), why did we not do it in the first place?

Most people would answer that they don’t have the money or capital to put up a business. This is partially a correct answer. The other half of it would be “we usually don’t have an idea what business to put up.” Most OFWs who stay for good in the Philippines don’t have an idea what to put up, and how to put up a business. Other OFWs prioritize buying a flat screen tv, a nice cellphone or going to Boracay among others, ahead of organizing a business. The result; no idea and worst no more savings at all to do their project.

Forcefully, most OFWs return to being an OFW even at a rather old age, because they did not meet what they were suppose to do in the first place. That is to work abroad, save some money for capital and return to the Philippines to put up a business. When the time comes that the body cannot take the punishment of working abroad, we return home penniless. All of us OFWs are bound to go home someday, even if you are an American or Canadia citizen. But being in the Philippines without money or even without something to do is hell on earth.

Fortunately as time passes there are opportunities that sprout up, changing the ones that are obsolete. One of which is AIM GLOBAL Networking. Why networking? First it requires little capital to the business, to become an AIM GLOBAL distributor you only need 7980 pesos. At this amount you have a legitimate business that could profit you a lot when you do it in the long run. The usual comments made on this are:

AIM GLOBAL is scam or pyramiding:

First of all, if you only heard it next door or formulated this on your head without even listening to the marketing plan of AIM GLOBAL, then sad to say you are definitely wrong. You cannot assume something until you have heard and learn about it.

I have no time to this:

When you stay for good in the Philippines you have all the time in the world to do something. Or if you are employed; Question: would you use your time to do something that can likely be the key to your dreams, or still do something which definitely will be done a lot of years and still without any results (employment). Wasting your time on something that obviously doesn’t give you what you want for you and for your family is exactly what it is; a waste of time.

AIM GLOBAL can be done part time it doesn’t obligate you to leave your job.  But when the time comes and your network is large enough to earn you more than what you’ve expected, then you can make the firm decision to leave your job and do it full time.Last but not the least, AIM GLOBAL, particularly networking is not my line of work:

Let me tell you this: Here  in Italy there are many professionals who do domestic work. Meaning engineers, pharmacists and others who do household work, caregivers etc. Now tell me, is this the line of work that they learned to do in the Philippines. I’m not against employment, but it should only be a stepping stone to something more fruitful to undertake.

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